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Art ~ Paintings
Page 1 ~ R. Franklin
EOS Goddess of Dawn
by Richard Franklin
Limited edition on paper,
hand-embellished by the artist,
matted and framed under glass.
Purchased on 12/10/94
at Hanson Gallery on
Ocean & San Carlos Streets, Carmel.

We paid:
Limited Edition on Paper: $2,500.
Frame: $500.

Dimensions:
Print:
23" x 23" Frame: 37" x 37"

The Painting:
Early rising, the Dawn-Maiden, known as Aurora to the Romans, Eos lifts the veil of night and chases away the hosts of stars. Shown in a meditative posture, she rests in her mansion on Delos, the Isle of the rising sun. The glow of first light is reflected on the golden walls behind her.

The Artist:
Richard Franklin was born into a military family at Fort Belvoir, Virginia in 1961. He lived and studied in Europe, the Middle East and throughout the United States. After graduating from International University High School in Watford, England, Franklin attended Brigham Young University and the colorado Institute of Art. He studied the art of oil painting with master artists in Saudi Arabia.

Traveling extensively as a child and young adult planted the seed for what was to bloom into Richard Franklin's gift. As a child he filled countless sketchbooks with intricate drawings; as a teenager he studied with a Korean Master Artist.

In 1990 Franklin began a year of study in Europe—working in the museums of Belgium, Holland, France and Germany—directly from the original paintings of Rembrandt, Van Dyke, Vermeer, Monet and many others. He combined this classical tradition with his contemporary sensibility to create his unique works.

"I was trying to understand their sense of composition, color and portrayal of the human spirit. I find also that the effects of age add a richness and translucence that even they did not foresee—and which I try to reporduce."

Franklin's treatment of the human figure draws from the religious, mythological and secular visions of the past. To his compositions he adds visual elements of a more modern style. The result is his unique aesthetic, and perhaps the hope that the ideal of beauty sought by the Old masters still exists in today's world.

Franklin was able to depict the emotions and feelings of the subjects he painted. His ability to combine the romance and dimension of the "Old Masters" with the colors and solitude of our contemporary world has astounded his collectors worldwide. The current popularity of the Neo-Classical style has brought additional attention to Franklin's work. Although he admired the work of the Masters tremendously, Franklin developed and expressed his own idiom — his own unique, exquisite style of painting.

"The effects of age in an old painting add a richness and translucence that even the Masters did not foresee, and which I try to reproduce. Adding these ravages of time tends to lend character."

Tragically, Richard Franklin died in 1996 at the age of 35 in a private plane crash. His work has a dimensional look, a softness of color and a feeling of solitude and repose. At the time of his death he was an accomplished fine artist and a devoted family man. His work had been widely exhibited.

Dennis and I Discover Franklin

On my birthday weekend, Dennis and I stayed in Carmel and explored the many art galleries there. At Hanson Gallery we discovered gigantic canvas paintings depicting monumental Greek gods and goddesses as well as smaller canvases of beautiful Mediterranean women.

Each painting was mysterious because the realism of the figures was overpainted and marred by the seeming ravages of time. These beautiful gods and goddesses were wedded to the structures they inhabited. The paintings had an architectural look. The effect of an absolutely realistic pillar would be destroyed by the superimposed renderings of architectural drawings. Ripped and shredded ancient documents were seemingly pasted over figures and structures like a collage. The result was amazing because the spirit of an ancient soul shone through — as if they had overcome the degradations of age and time.

We fell in love with all of these canvases and lingered for many hours. Although we could not afford an original painting, we did invest in a high quality print. The hand embellishments by the artist give the prints an ancient oriental influence with the bleeding through of gold leaf and Chinese red.

Franklin named his women after classical themes but his portraits do not illustrate the stories of their namesakes. Rather, Franklin pays homage to famous writers and painters and their heroines.
Thisbe
by Richard Franklin
Z Gallerie high quality print

Dimensions:
Print:
9 1/4" x 13 3/4"
Matted & Framed: 17" x 21 1/2"

The Painting:
Thisbe refers to the fable of Pyramus and Thisbe, a sentimental romance told by Ovid, in which the young lovers are separated in their homes by an intervening wall through which they are able to communicate but are forbidden by their parents to be together. A doomed rendezvous brings about their deaths. The story is repeated by Chaucer in his "The Legend of Good Women" and made famous by the plot in Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet." Shakespeare also turns the lovers into a burlesque comedy in his "Midsummer Night's Dream." Here Franklin casts Thisbe in a flirtatious pose.

Atala
by Richard Franklin
Z Gallerie high quality print

Dimensions:
Print:
7 3/4" x 9 1/2"
Matted & Framed: 13" x 16"

The Painting:
Atala does not appear in Roman mythology. Her name may refer to a French writer, politician and diplomat who is considered to be the founder of Romanticism in French literature. In 1801, Francois-Rene, vicomte de Chateaubriand wrote about a native American heroine in "Atala". His exotic novel was the result of Chateaubriand's journey to North America in 1791. He wrote vivid, captivationg descriptions of nature in the sparsely settled American Deep South. He wrote in a style that was very innovative for the times. His style spearheaded what would later become the Romantic movement in France. (Yes, he was a food enthusiast and coined the name of a cut of tenderloin, the Chateaubriand steak.)

Donna Velata
by Richard Franklin
Z Gallerie high quality print

Dimensions:
Print:
7 3/4" x 9 1/2"
Matted & Framed: 13" x 16"

The Painting:
Donna Velata is probably an homage to Raphael's famous portrait, La Donna Velata, painted in 1516. In his work, The Woman with a Veil, Raphael presented the ideal example of a female. In Franklin's portrait, he abbreviates his title to Veiled Woman but places her veil down her back and wrapped around her bare legs.

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